I did some experimenting with this wax-resist dyeing process for a commissioned portrait project. I really enjoyed the process, and hope to get more opportunities to play with it again. 

  1. Camera: Canon EOS 40D
  2. Aperture: f/4
  3. Exposure: 1/60th
  4. Focal Length: 34mm
After a month of intense printmaking, I sat down to reflect on our work. Of the 14 printmakers, roughly half had no experience with printmaking before joining the internship, and the other half had studied printmaking through Youth Art Exchange for two or more years. Because of this divide I worked on creating an environment that would support peer-to-peer learning. We started the internship by creating personal goals, establishing group goals, and recording those goals through our sketchbooks and portfolios. Each week I provided a brief demo covering a new technique, and we had informal check-ins daily. As a whole, we knew what we were working towards, and continually worked on holding one another accountable. A lot of work got done in that short amount of time.

On our last day, I had one-on-one meetings with each intern to assess the overall internship. Our conversations resulted in some great feedback:

• Formal Assessment - While the informal check-ins were helpful to get a pulse on the overall attitude in the printmaking studio, I realized that many interns needed a formal assessment to help them meet their goals. One solution we came up with was to have weekly critiques. Interns felt that being required to “perform” and “showcase” their work to the group really helped them to solidify concepts before getting too far in the process.

• I like… What if… I wish… - Using these prompts, interns responded with feedback on the overall internship.

47% - “I liked learning from my peers
22% - “What if there were more critiques.”
22% - “What if there was greater focus on studio etiquette.”
25% - “I wish we had more time.”

After a month of intense printmaking, I sat down to reflect on our work. Of the 14 printmakers, roughly half had no experience with printmaking before joining the internship, and the other half had studied printmaking through Youth Art Exchange for two or more years. Because of this divide I worked on creating an environment that would support peer-to-peer learning. We started the internship by creating personal goals, establishing group goals, and recording those goals through our sketchbooks and portfolios. Each week I provided a brief demo covering a new technique, and we had informal check-ins daily. As a whole, we knew what we were working towards, and continually worked on holding one another accountable. A lot of work got done in that short amount of time.

On our last day, I had one-on-one meetings with each intern to assess the overall internship. Our conversations resulted in some great feedback:

Formal Assessment - While the informal check-ins were helpful to get a pulse on the overall attitude in the printmaking studio, I realized that many interns needed a formal assessment to help them meet their goals. One solution we came up with was to have weekly critiques. Interns felt that being required to “perform” and “showcase” their work to the group really helped them to solidify concepts before getting too far in the process.

• I like… What if… I wish… - Using these prompts, interns responded with feedback on the overall internship.

47% - “I liked learning from my peers

22% - “What if there were more critiques.”

22% - “What if there was greater focus on studio etiquette.”

25% - “I wish we had more time.”

indigo experiments

Working on a sketch for something BIG! (5.5’x8’ to be exact.)