skunkbear:

Close-ups of butterfly wing scales! You should definitely click on these images to get the full detail.
I’ve paired each amazing close-up (by macro photographer Linden Gledhill) with an image of the corresponding butterfly or moth.  The featured lepidoptera* are (in order of appearance):
Madagascar diadem Hypolimnas dexithea (photo by Michel-Georges Bernard)
Comet moth Argema mittrei (photo by Axel Strauß)
Sunset moth Chrysiridia rhipheus (photo from Wikimedia Commons) 
Giant Blue Morpho Morpho didius (photo by Didier Descouens, Muséum de Toulouse)
Rippon’s Birdwing Troides hypolitus (photo by Robert Nash, Ulster Museum)
*Lepidoptera (the scientific order that includes moths and butterflies) means “scaly wing.” The scales get their color not from pigment - but from microscopic structures that manipulate light.
The great science youtube channel “Smarter Every Day” has two videos on this very subject that I highly recommend:

skunkbear:

Close-ups of butterfly wing scales! You should definitely click on these images to get the full detail.
I’ve paired each amazing close-up (by macro photographer Linden Gledhill) with an image of the corresponding butterfly or moth.  The featured lepidoptera* are (in order of appearance):
Madagascar diadem Hypolimnas dexithea (photo by Michel-Georges Bernard)
Comet moth Argema mittrei (photo by Axel Strauß)
Sunset moth Chrysiridia rhipheus (photo from Wikimedia Commons) 
Giant Blue Morpho Morpho didius (photo by Didier Descouens, Muséum de Toulouse)
Rippon’s Birdwing Troides hypolitus (photo by Robert Nash, Ulster Museum)
*Lepidoptera (the scientific order that includes moths and butterflies) means “scaly wing.” The scales get their color not from pigment - but from microscopic structures that manipulate light.
The great science youtube channel “Smarter Every Day” has two videos on this very subject that I highly recommend:

skunkbear:

Close-ups of butterfly wing scales! You should definitely click on these images to get the full detail.
I’ve paired each amazing close-up (by macro photographer Linden Gledhill) with an image of the corresponding butterfly or moth.  The featured lepidoptera* are (in order of appearance):
Madagascar diadem Hypolimnas dexithea (photo by Michel-Georges Bernard)
Comet moth Argema mittrei (photo by Axel Strauß)
Sunset moth Chrysiridia rhipheus (photo from Wikimedia Commons) 
Giant Blue Morpho Morpho didius (photo by Didier Descouens, Muséum de Toulouse)
Rippon’s Birdwing Troides hypolitus (photo by Robert Nash, Ulster Museum)
*Lepidoptera (the scientific order that includes moths and butterflies) means “scaly wing.” The scales get their color not from pigment - but from microscopic structures that manipulate light.
The great science youtube channel “Smarter Every Day” has two videos on this very subject that I highly recommend:

skunkbear:

Close-ups of butterfly wing scales! You should definitely click on these images to get the full detail.
I’ve paired each amazing close-up (by macro photographer Linden Gledhill) with an image of the corresponding butterfly or moth.  The featured lepidoptera* are (in order of appearance):
Madagascar diadem Hypolimnas dexithea (photo by Michel-Georges Bernard)
Comet moth Argema mittrei (photo by Axel Strauß)
Sunset moth Chrysiridia rhipheus (photo from Wikimedia Commons) 
Giant Blue Morpho Morpho didius (photo by Didier Descouens, Muséum de Toulouse)
Rippon’s Birdwing Troides hypolitus (photo by Robert Nash, Ulster Museum)
*Lepidoptera (the scientific order that includes moths and butterflies) means “scaly wing.” The scales get their color not from pigment - but from microscopic structures that manipulate light.
The great science youtube channel “Smarter Every Day” has two videos on this very subject that I highly recommend:

skunkbear:

Close-ups of butterfly wing scales! You should definitely click on these images to get the full detail.
I’ve paired each amazing close-up (by macro photographer Linden Gledhill) with an image of the corresponding butterfly or moth.  The featured lepidoptera* are (in order of appearance):
Madagascar diadem Hypolimnas dexithea (photo by Michel-Georges Bernard)
Comet moth Argema mittrei (photo by Axel Strauß)
Sunset moth Chrysiridia rhipheus (photo from Wikimedia Commons) 
Giant Blue Morpho Morpho didius (photo by Didier Descouens, Muséum de Toulouse)
Rippon’s Birdwing Troides hypolitus (photo by Robert Nash, Ulster Museum)
*Lepidoptera (the scientific order that includes moths and butterflies) means “scaly wing.” The scales get their color not from pigment - but from microscopic structures that manipulate light.
The great science youtube channel “Smarter Every Day” has two videos on this very subject that I highly recommend:

skunkbear:

Close-ups of butterfly wing scales! You should definitely click on these images to get the full detail.

I’ve paired each amazing close-up (by macro photographer Linden Gledhill) with an image of the corresponding butterfly or moth.  The featured lepidoptera* are (in order of appearance):

*Lepidoptera (the scientific order that includes moths and butterflies) means “scaly wing.” The scales get their color not from pigment - but from microscopic structures that manipulate light.

The great science youtube channel “Smarter Every Day” has two videos on this very subject that I highly recommend:

Student Art: High Five

This summer I’ll be teaching printmaking at the Mission Grafica with high schoolers from Out of Site. This print was made using a stenciling process I did with Out of Site Youth Advisory Board members last week. Over the summer students will interview Excelsior residents to create community profiles that reflect the history and diversity of the Excelsior. I can’t wait to see what they come up with!

Bookbinding

Why?
Bookbinding let’s you stitch your stories together. Like papermaking, bookbinding has a long history of being an excellent resource for recording thoughts. To bind a book you simply need to attach pages together. Stitching techniques can be as decorative as you’d like, or as simple as a staple. Binding your own book means you can bind your own sketchbook, and no artist should be without a sketchbook.

What else?
Bookbinding gets us thinking about the sequence of things – the cover, the beginning, the middle, and the end of the book. Construct your own narrative of a real (or imagined!) event by writing, illustrating, and binding your story. More curriculum connectors can be found here.

mathani:

This puzzle consists of four hinged pieces which can be folded one way to a square and the other way to an equilateral triangle. Master puzzler Henry Dudeney demonstrated a wooden model before the London Royal Society in 1905.

mathani:

This puzzle consists of four hinged pieces which can be folded one way to a square and the other way to an equilateral triangle. Master puzzler Henry Dudeney demonstrated a wooden model before the London Royal Society in 1905.

Total lunar eclipse tonight: How to see the ‘blood moon’